Generic selectors
Exact matches only
Search in title
Search in content
Search in posts
Search in pages
Filter by Categories
15th National Conference of the IAOMFP, Chennai, 2006
Abstract
Abstracts from current literature
Acne in India: Guidelines for management - IAA Consensus Document
Addendum
Announcement
Art & Psychiatry
Article
Articles
Association Activities
Association Notes
Award Article
Book Review
Brief Report
Case Analysis
Case Letter
Case Letters
Case Notes
Case Report
Case Reports
Clinical and Laboratory Investigations
Clinical Article
Clinical Studies
Clinical Study
Commentary
Conference Oration
Conference Summary
Continuing Medical Education
Correspondence
Corrigendum
Cosmetic Dermatology
Cosmetology
Current Best Evidence
Current View
Derma Quest
Dermato Surgery
Dermatopathology
Dermatosurgery Specials
Dispensing Pearl
Do you know?
Drug Dialogues
e-IJDVL
Editor Speaks
Editorial
Editorial Remarks
Editorial Report
Editorial Report - 2007
Editorial report for 2004-2005
Errata
Erratum
Focus
Fourth All India Conference Programme
From Our Book Shelf
From the Desk of Chief Editor
General
Get Set for Net
Get set for the net
Guest Article
Guest Editorial
History
How I Manage?
IADVL Announcement
IADVL Announcements
IJDVL Awards
IJDVL AWARDS 2015
IJDVL Awards 2018
IJDVL Awards 2019
IJDVL Awards 2020
IJDVL International Awards 2018
Images in Clinical Practice
In Memorium
Inaugural Address
Index
Knowledge From World Contemporaries
Leprosy Section
Letter in Response to Previous Publication
Letter to Editor
Letter to the Editor
Letter to the Editor - Case Letter
Letter to the Editor - Letter in Response to Published Article
LETTER TO THE EDITOR - LETTERS IN RESPONSE TO PUBLISHED ARTICLES
Letter to the Editor - Observation Letter
Letter to the Editor - Study Letter
Letter to the Editor - Therapy Letter
Letter to the Editor: Articles in Response to Previously Published Articles
Letters in Response to Previous Publication
Letters to the Editor
Letters to the Editor - Letter in Response to Previously Published Articles
Letters to the Editor: Case Letters
Letters to the Editor: Letters in Response to Previously Published Articles
Medicolegal Window
Messages
Miscellaneous Letter
Musings
Net Case
Net case report
Net Image
Net Letter
Net Quiz
Net Study
New Preparations
News
News & Views
Obituary
Observation Letter
Observation Letters
Oration
Original Article
ORIGINAL CONTRIBUTION
Original Contributions
Pattern of Skin Diseases
Pearls
Pediatric Dermatology
Pediatric Rounds
Perspective
Presedential Address
Presidential Address
Presidents Remarks
Quiz
Recommendations
Regret
Report
Report of chief editor
Report of Hon : Treasurer IADVL
Report of Hon. General Secretary IADVL
Research Methdology
Research Methodology
Resident page
Resident's Page
Resident’s Page
Residents' Corner
Residents' Corner
Residents' Page
Retraction
Review
Review Article
Review Articles
Revision Corner
Self Assessment Programme
SEMINAR
Seminar: Chronic Arsenicosis in India
Seminar: HIV Infection
Short Communication
Short Communications
Short Report
Special Article
Specialty Interface
Studies
Study Letter
Supplement-Photoprotection
Supplement-Psoriasis
Symposium - Contact Dermatitis
Symposium - Lasers
Symposium - Pediatric Dermatoses
Symposium - Psoriasis
Symposium - Vesicobullous Disorders
SYMPOSIUM - VITILIGO
Symposium Aesthetic Surgery
Symposium Dermatopathology
Symposium-Hair Disorders
Symposium-Nails Part I
Symposium-Nails-Part II
Systematic Reviews and Meta-analysis
Tables
Technology
Therapeutic Guidelines
Therapeutic Guidelines - IADVL
Therapeutics
Therapy
Therapy Letter
View Point
Viewpoint
What’s new in Dermatology
View/Download PDF

Translate this page into:

Letter To Editor
2006:72:4;309-311
doi: 10.4103/0378-6323.26733
PMID: 16880583

Isolated scalp collagenoma mimicking cutis verticis gyrata

Chandrashekar Laxmisha1 , Devinder Mohan Thappa1 , S Jayanthi2
1 Department of Dermatology and STD, Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research (JIPMER), Pondicherry, India
2 Department of Pathology, Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research (JIPMER), Pondicherry, India

Correspondence Address:
Devinder Mohan Thappa
Department of Dermatology and STD, JIPMER, Pondicherry - 605 006
India
How to cite this article:
Laxmisha C, Thappa DM, Jayanthi S. Isolated scalp collagenoma mimicking cutis verticis gyrata. Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol 2006;72:309-311
Copyright: (C)2006 Indian Journal of Dermatology, Venereology, and Leprology

Sir,

Cutis verticis gyrata (CVG) is a descriptive term for a condition of the scalp, in which deep furrows and convolutions are seen, that resembles the outer surface of the cerebrum. The etiology is diverse, since different collections of cell types may be responsible for outward convoluted appearance, and range from inflammatory or hamartomatous infiltrations to neoplastic proliferations.[1] Collagenoma or connective tissue nevi of the collagen type are hamartomatous lesions, consisting of proliferation of normal collagen tissue. They can be hereditary or sporadic. The lesions consist of slightly elevated nodules that may be grouped or disseminated. Collagenomas located in the plantar or palmar surface with a cerebriform appearance are rare, and have been reported in Proteus syndrome.[2],[3] Herewith, isolated scalp collagenoma mimicking cutis verticis gyrata is being reported for its rarity and unique localization.

A 35-year-old female presented with asymptomatic, asymmetrically located, solitary, cerebriform skin colored plaque of 18´12 cm over the left temporal scalp since birth [Figure - 1]. The plaque had been gradually increasing in size. There was no other skin, mucosal, soft tissue, or bone abnormalities. There was no family history of similar disorder. A representative skin biopsy specimen (scalp) revealed a normal epidermis, and an increased amount of collagen fibres within the papillary and reticular dermis. Masson trichrome stain showed a significant increase of thick collagen bundles, with some of them in vertical bundles. Verhoeff- van Gieson stain showed absent elastic fibers [Figure - 2]. Skeletal survey did not demonstrate any evidence of osteopoikilosis. Routine investigations were normal. Systemic examination did not reveal any features suggestive of neurocutaneous syndromes or endocrine disorders. Thus, a diagnosis of isolated collagenoma of the scalp was made.

Connective tissue nevi of the hereditary type include dermatofibrosis lenticularis disseminata in the Buschke Ollendorff syndrome, familial cutaneous collagenoma, and shagreen patches seen in tuberous sclerosis. Connective tissue nevi of acquired type have been classified as eruptive collagenomas, isolated collagenomas, or isolated elastomas, depending on the number of lesions and the predominant dermal fibers present.[4] Familial cutaneous collagenoma is characterized by a symmetrical eruption of collagen-type nodules and plaques occurring predominantly over the upper back in adolescence. Shagreen patches are present in tuberous sclerosis, in association with the classic skin findings of adenoma sebaceum, periungual fibromas, and ash-leaf macules.[4] Plantar collagenomas with cerebriform appearance have been described as one of the major skin findings of Proteus syndrome. However, three cases of isolated plantar collagenoma without associated clinical abnormalities have been reported.[4] In one case of isolated collagenoma, Uitto et al[5] showed that the increased collagen is of the adult type (Type I) and that a local reduction of collagenase might be the cause of the excess collagen. In contrast to cutis verticis gyrata (CVG) with a diffuse involvement of scalp, isolated collagenoma presents as a localized abnormality. Biopsies from CVG usually show a thickened dermis with possible sebaceous hyperplasia, with or without collagen excess, whereas isolated collagenoma only shows excess of collagen without sebaceous hyperplasia. To the best of our knowledge, we could not find such a report of isolated collagenoma of the scalp presenting as cutis verticis gyrata, in the published literature.

In summary, collagenoma may be a marker for internal disease such as tuberous sclerosis, may occur in familial or eruptive patterns, or may be present in isolation, as in our case. As such, isolated cerebriform scalp collagenoma mimicking cutis verticis gyrata is unique, and may be considered as secondary cause of cutis verticis gyrata.

References
1.
Diven DG, Tanus T, Raimer SS. Cutis verticis gyrata. Int J Dermatol 1991;31:710-2.
[Google Scholar]
2.
Botella-Estrada R, Alegre V, Sanmartin O, Ros C, Aliaga A. Isolated plantar cerebriform collagenoma. Arch Dermatol 1991;127:1589-90.
[Google Scholar]
3.
Jones MS, Helm KF. A solitary warty plaque: Isolated cerebriform collagenoma. Arch Dermatol 1997;133:909-10, 912-3.
[Google Scholar]
4.
Choi JC, Lee MW, Chang SE, Choi JH, Sung KJ, Moon KC, et al. Isolated plantar collagenoma. Br J Dermatol 2002;146:164-5.
[Google Scholar]
5.
Uitto J, Tan EM, Ryhanen L. Inhibition of collagen accumulation in fibrotic processes: Review of pharmacologic agents and new approaches with amino acids and their analogues. J Invest Dermatol 1982;79:113s-20s.
[Google Scholar]

Fulltext Views
138

PDF downloads
55
Show Sections