Generic selectors
Exact matches only
Search in title
Search in content
Search in posts
Search in pages
Filter by Categories
15th National Conference of the IAOMFP, Chennai, 2006
Abstract
Abstracts from current literature
Acne in India: Guidelines for management - IAA Consensus Document
Addendum
Announcement
Art & Psychiatry
Article
Articles
Association Activities
Association Notes
Award Article
Book Review
Brief Report
Case Analysis
Case Letter
Case Letters
Case Notes
Case Report
Case Reports
Clinical and Laboratory Investigations
Clinical Article
Clinical Studies
Clinical Study
Commentary
Conference Oration
Conference Summary
Continuing Medical Education
Correspondence
Corrigendum
Cosmetic Dermatology
Cosmetology
Current Best Evidence
Current View
Derma Quest
Dermato Surgery
Dermatopathology
Dermatosurgery Specials
Dispensing Pearl
Do you know?
Drug Dialogues
e-IJDVL
Editor Speaks
Editorial
Editorial Remarks
Editorial Report
Editorial Report - 2007
Editorial report for 2004-2005
Errata
Erratum
Focus
Fourth All India Conference Programme
From Our Book Shelf
From the Desk of Chief Editor
General
Get Set for Net
Get set for the net
Guest Article
Guest Editorial
History
How I Manage?
IADVL Announcement
IADVL Announcements
IJDVL Awards
IJDVL AWARDS 2015
IJDVL Awards 2018
IJDVL Awards 2019
IJDVL Awards 2020
IJDVL International Awards 2018
Images in Clinical Practice
In Memorium
Inaugural Address
Index
Knowledge From World Contemporaries
Leprosy Section
Letter in Response to Previous Publication
Letter to Editor
Letter to the Editor
Letter to the Editor - Case Letter
Letter to the Editor - Letter in Response to Published Article
LETTER TO THE EDITOR - LETTERS IN RESPONSE TO PUBLISHED ARTICLES
Letter to the Editor - Observation Letter
Letter to the Editor - Study Letter
Letter to the Editor - Therapy Letter
Letter to the Editor: Articles in Response to Previously Published Articles
Letters in Response to Previous Publication
Letters to the Editor
Letters to the Editor - Letter in Response to Previously Published Articles
Letters to the Editor: Case Letters
Letters to the Editor: Letters in Response to Previously Published Articles
Medicolegal Window
Messages
Miscellaneous Letter
Musings
Net Case
Net case report
Net Image
Net Letter
Net Quiz
Net Study
New Preparations
News
News & Views
Obituary
Observation Letter
Observation Letters
Oration
Original Article
ORIGINAL CONTRIBUTION
Original Contributions
Pattern of Skin Diseases
Pearls
Pediatric Dermatology
Pediatric Rounds
Perspective
Presedential Address
Presidential Address
Presidents Remarks
Quiz
Recommendations
Regret
Report
Report of chief editor
Report of Hon : Treasurer IADVL
Report of Hon. General Secretary IADVL
Research Methdology
Research Methodology
Resident page
Resident's Page
Resident’s Page
Residents' Corner
Residents' Corner
Residents' Page
Retraction
Review
Review Article
Review Articles
Revision Corner
Self Assessment Programme
SEMINAR
Seminar: Chronic Arsenicosis in India
Seminar: HIV Infection
Short Communication
Short Communications
Short Report
Special Article
Specialty Interface
Studies
Study Letter
Supplement-Photoprotection
Supplement-Psoriasis
Symposium - Contact Dermatitis
Symposium - Lasers
Symposium - Pediatric Dermatoses
Symposium - Psoriasis
Symposium - Vesicobullous Disorders
SYMPOSIUM - VITILIGO
Symposium Aesthetic Surgery
Symposium Dermatopathology
Symposium-Hair Disorders
Symposium-Nails Part I
Symposium-Nails-Part II
Tables
Technology
Therapeutic Guidelines
Therapeutic Guidelines - IADVL
Therapeutics
Therapy
Therapy Letter
View Point
Viewpoint
What’s new in Dermatology
Original Article
2002:68:5;270-271
PMID: 17656964

Sero-prevalence of HIV infections among STD clinic attenders at Medical College, Calcutta

Paritosh Kumar Banerjee, Manol Kumar Mandal
 Department of Dermatology and STD Medical College and Hospital, Calcutta -700 073, India

Correspondence Address:
Paritosh Kumar Banerjee
Department of Dermatology and STD Medical College and Hospital, Calcutta -700 073
India
How to cite this article:
Banerjee P, Mandal M. Sero-prevalence of HIV infections among STD clinic attenders at Medical College, Calcutta. Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol 2002;68:270-271
Copyright: (C)2002 Indian Journal of Dermatology, Venereology, and Leprology

Abstract

A study was undertaken from June 1999 to June 2000 with 4650 subjects, 2177 males and 2473 females, attending the STD clinic at Medical College, Calcutta. Study revealed 1.6% seropositivity. Highest prevalence of HIV seropositivity 5.2% was noted among young males upto 30 years of age. In females highest prevalence of HIV seropositivity was found among the age group of 31-40 years.
Keywords: HIV Seropositivity, STDs

Introduction

HIV infection is associated with high morbidity and mortality and there is no curable treatment. In India HIV infection emerged in mid 1980 but there is rapid increase in its incidence and prevalence.[1] Seropositivity in India was estimated to be 1.4 to 14% among patients attending STD clinic,[2] and it has recently been estimated that India has highest number of HIV infected patients.[3] Accumulating evidence suggests that concurrent infections with other sexually transmitted diseases increase the risk of HIV transmission, so there will be greater prevalence of HIV infections in STD clinic attenders.[4],[5]

In view of the sparse literature available on seroprevalence of HIV in STD clinic attenders at Calcutta, need was felt to study seroprevalence of HIV infection in STD clinic offenders at Calcutta Medical College.

Materials and Methods

All the patients attending STD clinic from June 1999 to June 2000 were screened for HIV infections and demographic details were noted for all patients. Blood samples were drawn from 2177 male patients and from 2473 female patients.

Five ml blood was collected from each patient. Serum was separated and stored at 4° C till Elisa was done. Indirect Elisa test was performed according to manufacturer′s instructions. For every assay appropriate control was included.

Serum samples showing initial positivity by initial Elisa or equivocal samples were subjected to second Elisa test. All cases were confirmed by Western blot (Immuno test).

Results

HIV seropositivity was confirmed by Western blot in 40 cases out of 2177 males (1.8%) and 34 cases out of 2473 females (1.3%). Overall seropositivitywas (1.6%). Highest HIV seropositivity (5.2%) was found among young males upto 30 years of age. Among females highest HIV seropositivity was found in 31 - 40 years of age group.

Details of results are shown in [Table - 1] and [Table - 2].

Discussion

Since mid nineties, there is an increasing trend of HIV seropositivity among STD clinic attenders in Calcutta. Earlier reports suggested 1.32% of HIV seropositivity among STD clinic attenders in Calcutta,[6],[7] and recently it is estimated to be 2.3%.[8]

Our study revealed 1.6% HIV seropositivity. Among male attenders most people having HIV seropositivity belonged to lower middle class. Four patients were immigrants from Bombay, most of them frequently visited brothel. Among female attenders most of them having seropositivity, were house wives. Three patients were sex workers by profession. Two patients had multiple sex partners and one male had homosexual relationship.

From above study we conclude that there is a steady increase in prevalence rate of HIV seropositivity among STD clinic attenders.

References
1.
Brokmeyer RT, Quenn M, Shephard S. The AIDS epidemic in India, A new method for estimating current human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), incidence rates. Am J Epidemiol 1995; 145: 709 - 713.
[Google Scholar]
2.
Mehendale SM, Rodrighes JJ, Brokmeyer RS, et al. incidence and predictors of human immunodeficiency virus type I seroconversion in patients attending sexually transmitted disease clinics in India. J Infect Disease 1995; 172: 1486 - 1491.
[Google Scholar]
3.
Bollinges RC, Tripathy SP, Quinn TC. The human immunodeficiency virus epidemic in India : current magnitude and future projections. Medicine (Baltimore) 1995;74 : 97- 106.
[Google Scholar]
4.
Piot P, Logo M. Genital ulcers, other STD and sexual transmission of HIV. Br Med J 1989; 296 : 623 - 624.
[Google Scholar]
5.
Greenblatt RM, Lukchart SA, Plummer FA, et al. Genital ulceration as risk factor of HIV infection. AIDS 1988; 2 : 45-50.
[Google Scholar]
6.
Neogy DK, Bhattacharya N, Chakraborty T, et al. Prevalence of HIV-2 and mode of transmission in West Bengal. IJMM 1998; 16:26 - 28.
[Google Scholar]
7.
Neogi DK, Roy AK, Chakraborty T, et al. Seroprevalence of HIV antibody amongst STD clinic attenders in Calcutta. Indian J Dermatol 1999; 44: 183 - 186.
[Google Scholar]
8.
Mitra K, Roy AK, Dutta PK, et al. Seroprevalence of concomitant HIV and syphilitic infections among the STD clinic attending in Calcutta. Indian J Dermatol 2000;45 (4).
[Google Scholar]
Show Sections